Kim Moreland

Title:
Professor of English
Office:
Room 633
Address: Phillips Hall
Phone: 202-994-7214
Email:
moreland@gwu.edu

The Medievalist Impulse in American Literature: Twain, Adams, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 1996.

“Death by Drowning: Trauma Theory and Islands in the Stream.” Forthcoming in Hemingway and Cuba. Ed. Larry Grimes and Bickford Sylvester. Kent: Kent State UP, 2010.

“Hemingway and Women at the Front: Blowing up Bridges in The Fifth Column, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and Other Works.” Forthcoming in Hemingway and War. Ed. James Meredith and Bickford Sylvester. Kent: Kent State UP, 2010.

“John Steinbeck of Monterey, American Knight.” Accepted for inclusion in Essays at John Steinbeck's Centenary. Ed. Susan Shillinglaw, Ruth Prigozy, and Robert DeMott. Book is currently under consideration by U of Alabama P.

“Teaching Gatsby as American Culture-Hero.” Approaches to Teaching Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby.” Ed. Jackson Bryer and Nancy Van Arsdale. New York: MLA P, 2009: 93-98.

“A Farewell to Arms, World War I, and the “stockyards at Chicago.” Teaching Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms.” Ed. Lisa Tyler. Kent: Kent State UP, 2008: 85-97.

“Bringing ‘Italianicity’ Home: Hemingway Returns to Oak Park.” In Hemingway’s Italy: New Perspectives. Ed. Rena Sanderson. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2006. 51-61.

“Music in The Great Gatsby and The Great Gatsby as Music.” In Literature and Musical Adaptation. Ed. Michael J. Meyer. New York and Amsterdam: Rodopi P, 2002. 29-45.

“To Have and Hold Not: Marie Morgan, Helen Gordon, and Dorothy Hollis.” In Hemingway and Women: Female Critics and the Female Voice. Ed. Lawrence Broer and Gloria Holland. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2002: 81-92.

“Hemingway's I-Lands in the Streams.” North Dakota Quarterly 68.2-3 (2001): 123-31.

Current Research

My research focuses on American fiction of the modernist period. I have written extensively on Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald, and I am now looking at Martha Gellhorn, whose fiction has been inappropriately neglected. My theoretical approach is eclectic; I most often use feminist theory, cultural studies, and psychobiography to interrogate literary texts, while recently employing trauma theory as well.

Education

Ph.D Brown University, 1984.
M.A. SUNY-Binghamton, 1978.
A.B. Ohio University, 1976.